It becomes understood that happiness is not dependent on circumstances being exactly as we want them to be, or on ourselves being exactly as we’d like to be. Rather, happiness stems from loving ourselves and our lives exactly as they are, knowing that joy and pain, strength and weakness, glory and failure are all essential to the full human experience.
— Kristin Neff
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To schedule an appointment with Sarah contact us at
(718) 260-6042
or send us a message!

Sarah Spitz, LMSW

Hi, I’m Sarah!  I am a therapist, health coach, and certified yoga teacher who believes in holistic healing and the power of connection and compassion. I became a therapist because I am passionate about supporting people in living their best lives.  I seek to empower individuals who are looking to better understand themselves, cope effectively with various life stressors, navigate relationship issues, work on self-esteem, or want to integrate mental health into their overall wellness.  I also specialize in working with individuals struggling with disordered eating and negative body image.

Cultivate Compassion and Challenge Unrelenting Standards
While many of us can readily show compassion for others, we struggle with self-compassion. Would you speak to others the way you speak to yourself? Probably not. Failure to be compassionate with ourselves often goes hand in hand with unrelenting standards, self-criticism, and low self-worth (cue the voice that says, “you’re a failure”). I work with clients to build up their self-compassion muscle in order to meet themselves with kindness and understanding when they make a mistake or things don't go their way (which is inevitable - we’re human!), and to identify, understand, and challenge the unrelenting standards they have for themselves.

Heal Your Relationship With Food, Exercise, and Your Body
Do you find yourself preoccupied with intrusive thoughts about your body, food, or exercise? Do you struggle with emotional eating, rigid food rules, or overexercising?  If so, I'm here to help. I work with clients to live with freedom from these thoughts and behaviors. I take a non-diet, health at every size, all foods fit approach, and recognize that food and body image struggles exist on a spectrum.  My hope is to help you get to a place where what you eat and do promotes functionality (what your body can do) over form (what your body looks like). 

Set Boundaries and Find Balance
Do you prioritize the needs of others at the expense of your own wellbeing? Do you suppress your own emotions and preferences in order to make others happy or to avoid a negative reaction? I work with individuals who struggle with setting boundaries, whether with family, partners, friends, or jobs.  Although it's hard work to let go of these patterns, it will ultimately lead to more fulfilling relationships and a greater sense of self-worth. I want to help you to find the balance between taking care of yourself and giving to others.

How I Help
From personal experience, I believe that true healing occurs when we take a holistic approach and take care of all aspects of ourselves (mind, body, spirit). While my my work is technically in the mental health field, everything is connected!  I strive to help client's build and strengthen the mind-body connection as well as identify places in their lives (environment, work, relationships, etc.) where they would like to find balance and healing. 

I use a client-centered, collaborative, and integrative approach, and strive to create a safe and supportive environment for self-exploration and personal growth. My approach is psychodynamic but includes techniques from schema, cognitive behavioral, and mindfulness therapies.  I also incorporate elements from my background as a holistic health coach and yoga teacher. 

More About Me
I love yoga, reading, traveling (Tokyo and Sedona are two of my favorite places), and finding any opportunity to hang out with a Boston Terrier. I am immensley grateful for those in my life who have taught me and continue to remind me to embrace vulnerability.