How to Fight Procrastination with Compassion

By Julia Silveira, LMSW

We all procrastinate from time to time. Have you ever felt that you didn’t prepare enough for a meeting? Relied on a last-minute pressure to complete a task? Waited to feel inspired to start doing work? Likely, we all have procrastinated before and have the experience of submitting work last minute or completing a task past due date. Procrastination usually comes with regret and some negative consequences. It has been shown that little good can come from procrastination, and is associated with worse academic performance and greater sickness. Then why do we do it?

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Elizabeth Cobb
Go-Getters, Unite!  Working SMARTer, Not Harder, Towards Your Goals

By Julia Suklevski, LMSW

Intrigued by this blog’s title?  Perhaps you are finding yourself at a crossroads of working towards accomplishing the next best thing in your life, whether that be personally or professionally.  Whether you are the self-proclaimed “go-getter” within your social group, or tend to lean on the side of the unabashed procrastinator, working towards goals that are in alignment with what you what to bring into your life can be challenging.  Chances are, you have expectations for beginning therapy, and will be collaborating with your therapist about treatment goals because you envision a change in your life. 

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Elizabeth Cobb
Integrating Mindfulness Into Your Daily Routine

By Hannah Sherman, LMSW

Finding a sense of calm and present-moment awareness in a busy and vibrant city is no easy feat. Chaotic routines and overstimulation are inevitable obstacles, thus inviting the need to be thoughtful about finding time for self-care. Mindfulness doesn’t require an hour-long formal meditation practice each day. Jon Kabat Zinn, founder of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, defines mindfulness as, “paying attention on purpose, in the present moment, and non-judgmentally to the unfolding of experience.”

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Elizabeth Cobb
The Importance of Self-Care

By Heather Matzkowitz, LMSW

Self-care involves treating yourself as kindly as you treat others, and it is essential to a happy and healthy life. Often, it is when we feel we don't have enough time to focus on ourselves that we need self-care the most. I have been guilty of neglecting my own self-care in the past, but once I came to the realization of how essential my own needs were, I was able to fully give myself to others.

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Elizabeth Cobb
The Danger of Comparing Ourselves to Others

By Hannah Tishman, LMSW

We encounter dozens of people throughout the course of our day. Whether it is during our morning commute, in a meeting at work, or with friends, it is inevitable that we interact with others on a daily basis. As a human species, we instinctively compare ourselves to one another. We compare as a way to figure out where we fit in amongst others and to more deeply understand ourselves. It is not only a survival technique, but it is how we function as social animals.

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Elizabeth Cobb
Is Your Friendship Toxic?

By Jessica Glynn, LMSW

Have you ever had a friend that loves to call you to gossip or speak poorly of others? If so, you may come to a point in your friendship when you ask yourself this question: if they are speaking this way about others, what are they saying about me? Or if they are lying and ditching other plans to hang out with you, how many times have they lied to you so that they can pursue a seemingly “better” plan for the evening or weekend?

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Elizabeth Cobb
Snooze, Don’t Lose!

By Amy Brightman, LCSW

March marks a big month for sleep — springing forward for Daylight Saving Time and celebrating National Sleep Awareness Week and World Sleep Day. Despite all of this focus on sleep, it has seems like many people are complaining about being tired. We know that losing an hour of sleep takes about a week or two to adjust after the change, so why does it seem like people are still reporting feeling overly tired? Here are five quick tips to help you gain mastery over your sleep.

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Elizabeth Cobb
Schema Therapy and Emotional Deprivation

By Rosie Barton, LMSW

I often work with men and women who describe a feeling of emptiness and persistent loneliness, but can’t seem to articulate why they feel this way. Often times, these clients lead lives that they feel “should” be fulfilling, though nonetheless they are plagued with this sense that something is missing. Although these clients may have successful careers, have friends they care about, social skills, and hobbies, they might feel as if they are going through life checking off boxes or a to do list, rather than truly being present or enjoying themselves.

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Elizabeth Cobb
The Importance of Practicing Self-Compassion 

By Kara Korengold, LMSW 

Research shows that practicing self-compassion has significant benefits for our mental health and overall well-being. Specifically, those who practice self-compassion experience greater social connectedness, emotional intelligence, happiness, and life satisfaction. Self-compassion has also been found to help reduce anxiety, depression, shame, and fear of failure, as well as increase self-esteem and resilience. Those who practice self-compassion are more likely to have healthy relationships with others as well as have a stable sense of self-worth, not requiring external validation to feel good about themselves.

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Sarah Spitz
What Is Mindfulness and How Do We Practice It?

By Julie Stolper, LMSW

Mindfulness is a state of attentiveness that promotes awareness of the present moment, including the feelings, senses, emotions, and thoughts that come along with it. Within this, mindfulness encourages not only awareness of the present moment, but ACCEPTANCE as well. By acceptance, mindfulness refers to a place of nonjudgement which allows individuals to not only recognize and observe what they are feeling, but to do so without judgement of themselves for that feeling or present moment.

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Sarah Spitz
Are You Getting in Your Own Way?

By Karen Chuzmir LMSW, CASAC

It is commonly said that insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results. So why is it that so many people find themselves in a seemingly endless cycle of despair?  While there is no one easy answer when it comes to patterns of self-sabotage, I do believe that there are often several potential factors at play. 

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Elizabeth Cobb
Exploring Termination in Therapy

By Amy Brightman, LCSW

It is wonderful when you’re able to find a good fit with a therapist — you’ve worked for a while on developing trust, you’ve shared intimate details and thoughts about your life, and you’ve committed to taking time every week to focus on you. So, understandably, you might be hesitant to let this go. Here are some pointers to help you reflect on the trajectory of your therapy and when it might be time to wrap things up:

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Elizabeth Cobb
Understanding and Cultivating Resilience

By Hannah Rogawski, LMSW

You may not think you have resilience. You might not even be sure what resilience really means. The APA defines resilience as “the process of adapting well in the face of adversity, trauma, tragedy, threats or significant sources of stress — such as family and relationship problems, serious health problems, or workplaces and financial stressors. It means bouncing back from difficult experiences.”

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Elizabeth Cobb
Break Free of Perfectionism: Make Mistakes!

By Erica Cramer, LMSW

Many people say that they are perfectionists.  So what is perfectionism? Perfectionism is a way to be constantly disappointed with yourself.  Perfectionism is an excuse to avoid a situation where you may receive an unsatisfactory result or even fail.  Perfectionism is an obstacle to taking chances and risks.  A dear friend once told me, “life is about making mistakes.”  I make mistakes every single day — and let me tell you, a big secret to life is accepting that mistakes are an inevitable part of being human and learning to move forward when you make them.  

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Elizabeth Cobb
Why Should I Feel my Feelings?

By Alessandra Mikic, LMSW

I used to be told to “feel my feelings” by an old therapist, and I’d secretly roll my eyes. If I knew I was feeling sad or angry, why in the world would I stay in that state? What was the point? I didn’t understand how it was of any benefit to me, and it felt like mumbo jumbo therapy crap. And anyway, even if I wanted to “feel my feelings,” what did that mean? After doing a ton of research (and becoming a therapist myself - that’s another post), I found my answers. There are two compelling reasons to feel your feelings, and they’re both based on cutting-edge neuroscience:

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Elizabeth Cobb
Holding Space – Strengthening Trust Through Validation

Validation is certainly not a foreign concept. Chances are, you’ve been practicing the art of validation your entire life, consciously and unconsciously, and it is reinforced by the positive and beneficial outcomes you experience. When you validate someone when they approach you during a moment on distress, or when they are feeling unsure, doubtful, or otherwise discontent with present circumstances, there may be an immediate change in the person’s verbal and nonverbal communication that makes you more self-aware of your role in changing their emotional stability. 

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Sarah Spitz
How to Achieve Perfectionism in Parenting: Stop Trying to be Perfect

In Brene Brown’s book, Daring Greatly, she dedicates an entire chapter to what she calls, Wholehearted Parenting: Daring to be the adults we want our children to be. She says, “When we obsess over our parenting choices to the extent that most of us do, and then see someone else making different choices, we often perceive that difference as direct criticism of how we are parenting.” She goes on to write about not shaming yourselves, your kids, and other parents. I interpreted this chapter and much of her book as: ​we all need to be kinder to ourselves.

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Elizabeth Cobbchildren
Defeating the Valentine’s Day Blues for Singles

Month two of the new year comes around and you notice that stores, television ads, and much of social media begin advertising love. You can barely go a day without being reminded of the holiday coming up. That good old fourteenth day of February. Does this day provoke sadness in you? Do you not know what to do if you don’t have a significant other to spend the day with? 

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Elizabeth Cobb
Developing a Healthy Relationship With Exercise

The health benefits of exercise are undeniable and run the gamut from heart health to stress relief. However, if you are in recovery from an eating disorder, exercise is a tricky subject. Often times reincorporating exercise triggers old thought patterns and behaviors, so proceeding with caution is vital. So what can you do when you feel ready to reincorporate exercise? How can you tell whether it is coming from a disordered or healthy place? 

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Reflecting on Our Resolutions

The New Year brings fresh beginnings, direction, dreams, goals, and resolutions.  This time of year, resolutions have been made and are in full force — joining a gym, decreasing drinking and/or smoking, finding a new job, working towards financial security, etc. For many people, these resolutions are typically the go-to in starting a healthier New Year to improve and ultimately change their overall wellbeing.  Hmm, but what about resolutions related to one’s emotional wellbeing? 

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Elizabeth Cobb